Student-Led Interventions: Developing Campus Accessibility in Writing Classrooms

Proposal Title: 
Student-Led Interventions: Developing Campus Accessibility in Writing Classrooms
Presenter(s): 
Abstract: 

This presentation not only argues a more progressive use of integrating disability into pedagogical practices but also advocates making it an integral part of classroom curricula. Writing-based courses are a perfect space to explore current discourses surrounding disability, especially as it relates to identifying and accommodating to learning differences and accessible spaces. If given the challenge, students will identify these needs and implement campus-wide changes for the betterment of their community. This presentation contributes to the ongoing discussion of incorporating disability into pedagogical practices by using student-identified needs to better the campus environment for all students, able and disabled alike.

Proposal: 

This presentation argues not only for a more progressive use of integrating disability into pedagogical practices but also advocates making it an integral part of classroom curricula. Students with disabilities entering college classrooms are on the rise and “recent surveys have found that 7 to 9 percent of students enrolled in four-year colleges report having a disability…But because many students choose not to self-identify for fear of stigma, disability resource officers estimate that there are more students with disabilities in colleges than these numbers indicate” (Lewiecki-Wilson and Brueggeman 2). Society misses out on valuable opinions and intelligent contributions when people with impairments do not have equal access to work, public forums, or spaces.  Instructors and academic institutions have an ethical responsibility to ‘intervene’ by not only implementing a variety of learning strategies including the use of Assistive Technology, but also through educating students on accessibility to meet the ever increasing needs of people who have various learning differences and challenges.

Writing-based courses are a perfect space to explore current discourses surrounding disability, especially as it relates to identifying and accommodating to learning differences and accessible spaces. If given the challenge, students will identify these needs to implement campus-wide changes for the betterment of their community. Using a Campus Accessibility project as an example, this presentation contributes to the ongoing discussion of incorporating disability into pedagogical practices by using student-identified needs to better the campus environment for all students, able and disabled alike.

Lewiecki-Wilson, Cynthia and Brenda Jo Brueggeman. Disability and the Teaching of Writing: A Critical Sourcebook. Bedford/St. Martin’s. 2008. Book.

Context: 
Instructors and academic institutions have an ethical responsibility to ‘intervene’ by not only implementing a variety of learning strategies including the use of Assistive Technology, but also through educating students on accessibility to meet the ever increasing needs of people who have various learning differences and challenges.
Proposal Type: 
individual